Posts Tagged ‘Veena’

MisraBani TantriCharya–Varanasi

04.26.13

Dr Lalmani Misra 

The first MisraBani TantriCharya is proposed to be organized at Varanasi in October 2013 with collaboration of  cultural organization(s) at local/ national level. Benares Hindu University has kindly offered its facilities for organizing Tantricharya. The event shall be held at Academic Staff College from 12 to 18 and at Faculty of Music and Performing Arts no 19th and 20th October 2013.

 

Dr. Lalmani Misra

Dr. Lalmani Misra, well known as a Vichitra Veena player, had an extraordinary ability for creating music. Spontaneity and perfection defined his music. The following remarkable quotes by prominent artists and members of the musico-academic community would give a brief notion of Dr. Misra’s exemplary creative strength before we proceed to analyze his genius:

"Prof. Misra was the Music Director of Udaya Shankar’s troupe and job amply speaks of his eminence as musician. He contributed some of lively tunes and melodious notes to music performances given in foreign countries which kept the audience spell bound. He gave his performance in almost 150 big towns of America and Europe and was hailed by one and all as a talented artist of the age. Prof. Misra can play on eight instruments with a master’s hand." [News Paper item (Telegraph May 6, 1952) excerpt]

Dr. Misra’s contribution to the music world is that he has written hundreds of compositions for sitar in more than 150 common and uncommon Ragas. Moved by a desire to perfect a system in instrumental music that would be as complete as the vocal tradition, he created a new Gat style, which gradually has come to be known as ‘Misrabani’. It was also referred to as ‘Koot Ki Gat’ owing to the complexity of the Gat. They were so labeled, recalling instances of using such complex rhythmic patterns by earlier musicians in flourishes hailed by the aficionados as Koot ki Taan.

 

MisraBani

DawnVeenThe Misrabani compositions he created are serious compositions in stylistic sense. They clarify that selection of Raga-s influences the minds of musicians.

Under this style he created a new Gatkari in Vilambit Jhoomara Tal, Vilambit Jhap Tal and Madhya-laya Ada Char Tal. In this new style Dr. Misra introduced Mizrab Bol DA RDA -R DA. Especially, in vilambit pace Da Rda -R Da shows a very different dimension of manifestation.

The oblique movement and complexity of a Raga is considered one of the main reasons for its unpopularity. There are many Raga-s that are extremely melodious and fulfill all the desired norms of Indian classical music (proper consonances with lower and upper tetra-chords) but owing to their complex nature they are rarely played by the instrumentalists. Most of such demanding Raga-s like Basant Bahar, Gandhari, Malhua Kedar, Anand Bhairav, Multani, Kaushik Kanhada, Malgunji, Bageshri Kanhada, Sindoora, Neelambari etc. were played by Dr. Misra.

Workshops have been engaged by Dr. Ragini Trivedi around the country to train Sitarists in this advanced and cerebral style of playing. One may view few excerpts on Youtube channel of Omenadnet.

 

Programme

MisraBani TantriCharya is aimed at young instrumentalists who have received professional training for 5 years or more.

Learners in the group (10 to 15) would be trained by two Misrabani Sitarists under supervision of Dr. Ragini Trivedi, daughter of Sangeetendu Pt. Lalmani Misra, creator of Misrabani string style. Senior-most disciple of Dr. Misra, Dr. Pushpa Basu would give expert guidance.

MisraBani TantriCharya would be hands-on intensive workshop of two four- hour sessions each day for 7 days.

  • Learners would be provided detailed syllabus with Mizrab Bol-s, Alankar-s and Compositions in play-as-you-read digital notation system, Ome Swarlipi.
  • Learners would make their own arrangements for lodging & boarding.
  • Learners would bring their own instruments: Sitar/ Sarod/ Veena/ Santoor.

 

Registration

Interested learner may send in their application forms through email and hard copy.

Email should be sent to ich@madhukali.org with subject; MisraBani TantriCharya attaching filled in application form by 15th August 2013 and scanned image of Demand Draft. The hard copy should be sent to Astha, B-31, Aakriti Garden, Nehru Nagar, Bhopal – 462003 (M.P.) India so as to reach before 31st August 2013.

Registration Fee:

Till 30th June 2013 Rs. 3,000.

Till 31st July 2013 Rs. 4,000.

Till 31st August 2013 Rs. 5,000.

Till 30th September 2013 Rs. 9,000 provided seats are available.

Discount for Students* Rs. 1,000.

 

Sponsorships

A limited number of Sponsorships by disciples of Sangeetendu Pt. Lalmani Misra have been reserved for exceptional learners between 21 to 28 years pursuing regular course in music in college/ UTD, subject to their selection by Madhukali.

Those desirous of Sponsorship should submit a detailed note of recommendation from a teacher of repute. The note should detail particulars of Raga, Tal the candidate can perform flawlessly. Application form & detailed note with Demand Draft of Rupees 1000 only payable to Madhukali at Bhopal should reach Astha, B-31, Aakriti Garden, Nehru Nagar, Bhopal – 462003 (M.P.) India before 15th June 2013. Scanned image of Demand Draft and duly signed note of recommendation, along with application in pdf (Portable Document Format), should be emailed to ich@madhukali.org before 10th June 2013.

*Students of UGC recognized College and University Teaching Departments would have to present current Scholar Identity Card along with recommendation of Head of Department.

Application

Click here to download form.

Resources

Articles on Omenad
Video on Omenadnet
Tweets #Tantricharya    Follow  @madhukali and @omenadnet

Discography

Misrabani Vichitra Veena: heritage aLive Vol. 1 {Published}

Format:  Sound Recording
Year: 2013
Publisher: Misrabani, Philadelphia, 2013
Description 1 audio disc (52 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.

lalmanimisra-884501956475 

Tracklist

Raga Malgunji                             38:50
            Alap, Jod
             Vilambit Jhumra Tal (slow 14 beats)
              Drut Ada CharTal (fast 14 beats)
Raga Bhupali                                  12:50
              Alap
               Kaharwa Tal (8 beats)

A Dawn of Veena: Bairagi  on Vichitra Veena by Dr. Lalmani Misra {more}

Format:  Sound Recording
Year: 2013
Publisher: Madhukali, Bhopal, 2013
Description 1 audio disc (51 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.

Tracklist

Raga Bairagi 
                Alap:  19:33
                   Jod:  10:24
                    Gat:   11:20
Raga Bhairavi
                  Dhun:  05:22 

Celestial Music of Pandit Lalmani Misra: Vichitra Vina  {more at omenad}

Format:  Video
Year: 2006
Publisher: Rohnert Park, CA: Music Dept., Sonoma State University, 2006
Description: 1 video disc (45 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.

Tracklist

Raga Sindura 
           Alap, Vilambit & Drut teental:  31:28
Raga Tilang                                                   10:23
Raga Bhupali                                                 15:31

India: Vicitra Vina : The Music of Pandit Lalmani Misra = Inde : Vicitra Vina : La Musique De Pandit Lalmani Misra    {buy at amazon?}

Format: Sound Recording
Year: 1996
Publisher: France: Auvidis Unesco, 1996
Description: 1 sound disc (62 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Tracklist

Raga Kausi Kanhada (Malkauns style)
                                                   Alap
                                                    Jod
                                                    Jhala
                                                    Gat in slow tintal
                                                     Gat in fast tintal

Nectar of the Moon: Vichitra Vina Music of Northern India  {buy at amazon?}

Format: Sound Recording
Year: 1981
Publisher: Los Angeles: Nonesuch, 1981
Description: 1 sound disc : 33 1/3 rpm, stereo. ; 12 in.

Tracklist

A Raga Ananda Bhairava                20:04
B1 Raga Multani                                   12:16
B2 Dhun In Raga Ananda Bhairavi  7:54

Material in possession of Libraries (Worldcat)

Publisher: Los Angeles, Ca. : Ravi Shankar Music Circle, ©1979

Document Type: Sound Recording

All Authors / Contributors: Lalmani Mishra; Chotey Lal

OCLC Number: 11153496

Performer(s): Lal Mani Mishra, vichitra veena ; Chotey Lal, tabla.

Production notes:
"Recorded in concert, Herrick Chapel, Occidental College–3/18/78"– Container.

Description: 1 sound cassette (60:00) : stereo.

Contents:

Basant bahar in Ektal, 12 beats and Teental, 16 beats —
Bhairavi  in Dadra, 6 beats —
Tabla solo Delhi style in Teental, 16 beats.

Concerts for Conservation

12.23.11

Performances by various artistes during Omenad Conference on 31st December, 1st January and 2nd January 2011 left a lasting impression on aficionados of Bhopal. Music lovers, scholars and enthusiasts travelled from across country to attend conference and concerts during three-day event organized by Madhukali in collaboration with Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya. Several well-wishers and music-lovers had expressed for another such event and at cities other than Bhopal.

In keeping with its philosophy to collaborate with like-minded bodies, Madhukali consented to cooperate with an upcoming cultural institution from Indore, Swar-Setu to present rare performances once again in both, Bhopal and Indore. Ethnomusicologist from Sonoma State University, Professor Laxmi Ganesh Tewari shall travel to India to perform in both cities. Madhukali, in all previous Omenad Annual Conferences had emphasized on the urgent need of safeguarding medieval and ancient Veena-s that over the past few decades have fast fallen into near obsolescence. The two forms of Veena that reached 20th century –  Rudra Veena and Vichitra Veena – have almost disappeared in 21st. Generational scions alone may find motivation to master these challenging ancient instruments.

Vichitra Veena was almost in oblivion when Dr. Lalmani Misra took it up and crafted a complete style for string instruments — Misrabani. Misrabani grants the instrument a unique identity. The string is freed from following human voiceand brings out unique elements beyond vocal cords. After his death in 1979, son Gopal Shankar taught himself and perfected the art of Vichitra Veena. Ragini Trivedi moved by the silenced Veena after sad demise of brother Gopal in 1999, vowed to regain its voice and trained herself to play Vichitra Veena in Misrabani style. Baha’ud’din Mohiuddin Dagar  son of famous musician Zia Mohiuddin Dagar was ingrained by his father to play Rudra Veena in dagarbani style. He represents the  Dagar lineage. First generations musicians have always enriched musical traditions; the art gains stability with generational artistes. Today, when globalization is changing dreams, mores and opportunities, such artistes are needed to keep their artistic traditions vibrant and current. Dr. Laxmi Ganesh Tewari too was trained by Dr. Lalmani Misra and was first to record vocal rendering of Sameshwari – a Raga consecrated by Dr. Misra to keep the knowledge of Samic notes alive.

 

Bhopal

Bharat Bhawan

7th January 2012

6:30 pm

Vichitra Veena          –         Dr. Ragini Trivedi (Daughter of Pt. Lalmani Misra) View Clip

Vocal Recital            –          Dr. Laxmi Ganesh Tewari  (Santa Rosa, California)

Indore

Preetamlal Dua Sabhagrih

8th January 2012

6:30 pm

RudraVeena                           –                           Bahauddin Dagar                                     

Vocal Recital                          –                           Dr. Laxmi Ganesh Tewari                    

For further information and reports, visit http://www.facebook.com/Omenad

Veena : Manifestation of Intangibility

08.04.09

Names are like human beings, often helpful but at times deceptive. Ancient most Indian treatise records two kinds of non-percussive instruments – Veena and Venu. Wheras Venu or flute during its evolution changed little, Veena had a hundred avatars. In the twentieth century, when most of the Veena-s had vanished and remaining ones had carved an exclusive niche with unique names, there are still some instruments that despite some changes, have retained both the ancient essence as well as name. Rudra Veena and Vichitra Veena of the North, with slight modifications in design and embellishment are in vogue as Tanjauri Veena and Gottu Vadyam in South. However, the music system remains unchanged despite distinction in form. In India music like painting, theater and poetry has never been separate from ordinary routine of people. All knowledge is dedication of one’s talent, all talent a medium of sublimating one’s ego. Learning Veena is a constant flattening of one’s ego till gain of wisdom.
For full essay visit Omenad.

Clutching the Intangible: Conserving Veena

08.04.09

In a world grappling with material, the concept of imperceptibility, invisibility and intangibility has slowly crept in. More and more activities, products and services are getting virtual. The materialization and later commercialization of music wiped out several traditions of musical practice. The nature of nation, society and family has been drastically overhauled with so-called empowerment of the “individual”. The price of such material empowerment has been paid by the individual in currency of emotional, intellectual and psychological balance. Fortunately, human life is governed by several factors. So while, technology and economic order pushes him in one direction, the local socio-cultural factors tend to retard the pull. There are some who ride the crest, while those in trough serve as anchors. It was decided by the supreme body that culture has an intangible side which needs concrete aid and support in order to maintain the essence of human nature – compassion, camaraderie and creativity. Indian music is best represented by the tradition of Veena-playing which involves performance, scholarship, innovation and crafting. For millenniums, it has retained continuity but the challenge of technology driven economy, which leaves little time to individual, is the toughest. It needs determination and concrete policy to keep Indian music in health.
Visit Omenad for complete article.